The Controllers

Ralph Schwitzgebel and his brother Robert have produced a panoply of devices for tracking individuals over long ranges; they may be considered the creators of the “electronic house arrest” devices recently approved by the courts.39 Schwitzgebel devices could be used for tracking all the physical and neurological signs of a “patient” within a quarter of a mile,40 thereby lifting the distance limitations which restricted Delgado.

In Ralph Schwitzgebel’s initial work, application of this technology to ESB seems to have been limited to cumbersome brain implants with protruding wires. But the technology was soon miniaturized, and a scheme was proposed whereby radio receivers would be mounted on utility poles throughout a given city, thereby providing 24-hour-a-day monitoring capability[41]. Like Heath, Schwitzgebel was much exercised about homosexuality and the use of intracranial devices to combat sexual deviation. But he has also spoken ominously about applying his devices to “socially troublesome persons”… which, of course, could mean anyone.42

Bryan Robinson, of the Yerkes primate laboratory has conducted fascinating simian research on the use of remote ESB in a social context. He could cause mothers to ignore their offspring, despite the babies’ cries. He could turn submission into dominance, and vice-versa.43

Perhaps the most disturbing wanderer into this mind-field is Joseph A. Meyer, of the National Security Agency, the most formidable and secretive component of America’s national security complex. Meyer has proposed implanting roughly half of all Americans arrested – not necessarily convicted – of any crime; the numbers of “subscribers” (his euphemism) would run into the tens of millions. “Subscribers” could be monitored continually by computer wherever they went. Meyer, who has carefully worked out the economics of his mass-implantation system, asserts that taxpayer liability should be reduced by forcing subscribers to “rent” the implant from the State. Implants are cheaper and more efficient than police, Meyer suggests, since the call to crime is relentless for the poor “urban dweller” – who, this spook-scientist admits in a surprisingly candid aside, is fundamentally unnecessary to a post-industrial economy. “Urban dweller” may be another of Meyer’s euphemisms: He uses New York’s Harlem as his model community in working out the details of his mind-management system.44

39. Robert L. Schwitzgebel and Richard M. Bird, “Sociotechnical Design Factors in Remote Instrumentation with Humans in Natural Environments,”

40. Thomas, JOURNEY INTO MADNESS, 277. In the BEHAVIOR RESEARCH METHODS AND INSTRUMENTATION article referenced above, Schwitzgebel details how the radio signals may be fed into a telephone via a modem and thus analyzed by a computer anywhere in the world.

41. Scheflin and Opton, THE MIND MANIPULATORS, 347-349.

42. Louis Tackwood and the Citizen’s Research and Investigation Committee, THE GLASS HOUSE TAPES (New York: Avon, 1973), 226.

43. Perry London, BEHAVIOR CONTROL (New York: Harper and Row, 1969), 145

44. Scheflin and Opton, THE MIND MANIPULATORS, 351-353; Tackwood, THE GLASS HOUSE TAPES, 228.

45. “Beepers in kids’ heads could stop abductors,” Las Vegas SUN, Oct. 27, 1987.

The Controllers
A new hypothesis of Alien Abduction
by Martin Cannon

http://www.constitution.org/abus/controll.htm