Posts from the ‘ParaPolitics’ Category

Judge orders FBI to investigate witness tampering in OKC Bombing Case

Utah lawyer Jesse Trentadue speaks to the media outside of federal court Monday, Aug. 25, 2014, in Salt Lake City. A federal judge has ordered the FBI to scrutinize allegations one of its agents pressured a witness not to testify in a trial about videos related to the Oklahoma City bombing. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — A federal judge has ordered the FBI to scrutinize allegations that the agency pressured a witness not to testify in a trial about videos related to the Oklahoma City bombing.

U.S. District Judge Clark Waddoups said the agency needs to get to the bottom of the claims from Utah lawyer Jesse Trentadue, who said that the FBI threatened to cut off a former government operative’s benefits if he appeared in court.

An FBI attorney said Monday that Trentadue’s allegations are baseless, and the only contact the agency was a cold call John Matthews placed to the Salt Lake City field office when he decided on his own not to testify. But Waddoups decided the lawyer’s report raises disturbing questions, and he wanted evidence that the agency has thoroughly investigated the matter.

“If all of this is nonsense, let’s bring this in and put an end to it,” the judge said. Waddoups ordered the attorneys to present the results of the witness-tampering investigation on Nov. 13.

The hearing is the latest in a case that reignited questions about whether others were involved in the bombing that killed 168 people. Trentadue argues surveillance videos from 1995 show Timothy McVeigh had an accomplice. The agency says its investigators have done a reasonable search and found no evidence of additional unreleased videos.

Matthews was supposed to testify during a late July bench trial, but Trentadue argued that he backed out at the last minute because the FBI threatened to cut off his veteran’s and disability benefits.

An agent was expected to testify Monday, but FBI attorney Kathryn Wyer said he shouldn’t be exposed to allegations of misconduct for taking Matthews’ phone call.

“This is another one of Mr. Trentadue’s conspiracy theories,” she said.

Under sharp questioning from the judge, Wyer said the agency didn’t present more evidence of its position because no one connected to the FBI was involved with Matthews’ decision not to testify.

Trentadue said Matthews was part of a stealth government operation before the Oklahoma City bombing tracking militia movements of which McVeigh was a part, and his testimony could support the idea that there was a second suspect.

Matthews told him and a colleague that he had been pressured in phone calls just before and after he was supposed to testify, the lawyer said. The FBI pointed to an emailed statement from Matthews saying that he had made the decision on his own.

Ultimately, Trenatdue wants the judge to let him search for tapes in the FBI archives.

He said a tape showing a second suspect would explain why his brother was flown to Oklahoma months after the bombing. His brother, who resembled a sketch of a suspect, died in a federal holding cell.

Judge orders FBI to investigate witness tampering.

Check out the original source here
ParaPolitics

www.parapolitics.info

Carlyle Group’s Latest Acquisition: the JFK Library!

Russ Baker’s latest at WhoWhatWhy.com

Some things you truly cannot make up. Like this: the museum and archives celebrating and exploring the life (if not really wanting to investigate the death) of John F. Kennedy is getting a facelift—courtesy of….the Carlyle Group.

This development was noted, without much fanfare, in a variety of major media. If there was a smidgen of irony, I missed it.

Yet, consider this: The ultimate globe-girdling corporation is playing a major role in preserving the memory of a president who at the time of his death was engaged in what may be described as mortal combat with outfits not unlike Carlyle—if smaller and less global. (I write about this in my book Family of Secrets but you can learn a lot more about JFK versus the corporations in Donald Gibson’s Battling Wall Street: The Kennedy Presidency.)

Kennedy was locked in grim battle with oil and steel and banking interests, hated by mining giants and soda pop companies, resisting pressures from the burgeoning defense industry, and on and on. The list of the offending and the aggrieved was endless. Executives were taking out ads to excoriate him, and even showing up at the White House to practically spit in his face.

“Those robbing bastards,” JFK told Walter Heller, chairman of the Council of Economic Advisors, when Heller mentioned the oil and gas industry. “I’m going to murder them.”—as cited in Family of Secrets, from audiotape held by John F. Kennedy Library and Museum

***

Why is the museum getting a facelift? Apparently, it is to “enhance the visual and interactive offerings.”

Does none of it have to do with the still-mysterious fire that broke out at the museum complex in Boston at approximately the same time as the bombings of the Boston Marathon? Initial news reports suggested that the fire might somehow be linked to the bombings, an event that led to the precedent-setting lockdown of a major American city in a military-style operation.

As with, well, practically everything about that day, we have since been assured that there was in fact no deeper mystery regarding the museum fire—that its cause was accidental and its timing a coincidence. And of course it may well have been, though I (a past user of the archives’ services) was struck by what seemed like a sheepish lack of openness on the part of library personnel when I made inquiries. Call it a reporter’s instincts.

JFK World vs Carlyle World

JFK, who entered the White House as outgoing president Eisenhower warned about the dangerous growth of a “military-industrial complex,” battled constantly with the same forces that today virtually reign supreme. He was an enthusiast of attempts in the mass media to draw attention to threats to freedom here at home, as seen in such movies as Seven Days in May, about a military coup against the U.S. government, and The Manchurian Candidate, about the subversion of our democratic system through mind control.

– See more at: http://whowhatwhy.com/2014/06/29/carlyle-groups-latest-acquisition-the-jfk-library/#sthash.y0R7QYCT.dpuf

Some things you truly cannot make up. Like this: the museum and archives celebrating and exploring the life (if not really wanting to investigate the death) of John F. Kennedy is getting a facelift—courtesy of….the Carlyle Group. – See more at: http://whowhatwhy.com/2014/06/29/carlyle-groups-latest-acquisition-the-jfk-library/#sthash.WKR3EuQV.dpuf

RussBaker.com » A Thousand Points of Blight January 8, 1991Some things you truly cannot make up. Like this: the museum and archives celebrating and exploring the life (if not really wanting to investigate the death) of John F. Kennedy is getting a facelift—courtesy of….the Carlyle Group.

This development was noted, without much fanfare, in a variety of major media. If there was a smidgen of irony, I missed it.

Yet, consider this: The ultimate globe-girdling corporation is playing a major role in preserving the memory of a president who at the time of his death was engaged in what may be described as mortal combat with outfits not unlike Carlyle—if smaller and less global. (I write about this in my book Family of Secrets but you can learn a lot more about JFK versus the corporations in Donald Gibson’s Battling Wall Street: The Kennedy Presidency.)

Kennedy was locked in grim battle with oil and steel and banking interests, hated by mining giants and soda pop companies, resisting pressures from the burgeoning defense industry, and on and on. The list of the offending and the aggrieved was endless. Executives were taking out ads to excoriate him, and even showing up at the White House to practically spit in his face.

“Those robbing bastards,” JFK told Walter Heller, chairman of the Council of Economic Advisors, when Heller mentioned the oil and gas industry. “I’m going to murder them.”—as cited in Family of Secrets, from audiotape held by John F. Kennedy Library and Museum

***

Why is the museum getting a facelift? Apparently, it is to “enhance the visual and interactive offerings.”

Does none of it have to do with the still-mysterious fire that broke out at the museum complex in Boston at approximately the same time as the bombings of the Boston Marathon? Initial news reports suggested that the fire might somehow be linked to the bombings, an event that led to the precedent-setting lockdown of a major American city in a military-style operation.

As with, well, practically everything about that day, we have since been assured that there was in fact no deeper mystery regarding the museum fire—that its cause was accidental and its timing a coincidence. And of course it may well have been, though I (a past user of the archives’ services) was struck by what seemed like a sheepish lack of openness on the part of library personnel when I made inquiries. Call it a reporter’s instincts.

JFK World vs Carlyle World

JFK, who entered the White House as outgoing president Eisenhower warned about the dangerous growth of a “military-industrial complex,” battled constantly with the same forces that today virtually reign supreme. He was an enthusiast of attempts in the mass media to draw attention to threats to freedom here at home, as seen in such movies as Seven Days in May, about a military coup against the U.S. government, and The Manchurian Candidate, about the subversion of our democratic system through mind control.

Times have certainly changed. The CEO of Carlyle, it should be noted, is a Democrat. He worked for Jimmy Carter. Other figures in the Carlyle orbit over the years have been Republicans—including George H.W. Bush, former Secretary of State James Baker III, and former Defense Secretary Frank Carlucci—and high-profile foreigners, including British Prime Minister John Major and members of the bin Laden family.

– See more at:

Some things you truly cannot make up. Like this: the museum and archives celebrating and exploring the life (if not really wanting to investigate the death) of John F. Kennedy is getting a facelift—courtesy of….the Carlyle Group.

This development was noted, without much fanfare, in a variety of major media. If there was a smidgen of irony, I missed it.

Yet, consider this: The ultimate globe-girdling corporation is playing a major role in preserving the memory of a president who at the time of his death was engaged in what may be described as mortal combat with outfits not unlike Carlyle—if smaller and less global. (I write about this in my book Family of Secrets but you can learn a lot more about JFK versus the corporations in Donald Gibson’s Battling Wall Street: The Kennedy Presidency.)

Kennedy was locked in grim battle with oil and steel and banking interests, hated by mining giants and soda pop companies, resisting pressures from the burgeoning defense industry, and on and on. The list of the offending and the aggrieved was endless. Executives were taking out ads to excoriate him, and even showing up at the White House to practically spit in his face.

“Those robbing bastards,” JFK told Walter Heller, chairman of the Council of Economic Advisors, when Heller mentioned the oil and gas industry. “I’m going to murder them.”—as cited in Family of Secrets, from audiotape held by John F. Kennedy Library and Museum

***

Why is the museum getting a facelift? Apparently, it is to “enhance the visual and interactive offerings.”

Does none of it have to do with the still-mysterious fire that broke out at the museum complex in Boston at approximately the same time as the bombings of the Boston Marathon? Initial news reports suggested that the fire might somehow be linked to the bombings, an event that led to the precedent-setting lockdown of a major American city in a military-style operation.

As with, well, practically everything about that day, we have since been assured that there was in fact no deeper mystery regarding the museum fire—that its cause was accidental and its timing a coincidence. And of course it may well have been, though I (a past user of the archives’ services) was struck by what seemed like a sheepish lack of openness on the part of library personnel when I made inquiries. Call it a reporter’s instincts.

JFK World vs Carlyle World

JFK, who entered the White House as outgoing president Eisenhower warned about the dangerous growth of a “military-industrial complex,” battled constantly with the same forces that today virtually reign supreme. He was an enthusiast of attempts in the mass media to draw attention to threats to freedom here at home, as seen in such movies as Seven Days in May, about a military coup against the U.S. government, and The Manchurian Candidate, about the subversion of our democratic system through mind control.

Times have certainly changed. The CEO of Carlyle, it should be noted, is a Democrat. He worked for Jimmy Carter. Other figures in the Carlyle orbit over the years have been Republicans—including George H.W. Bush, former Secretary of State James Baker III, and former Defense Secretary Frank Carlucci—and high-profile foreigners, including British Prime Minister John Major and members of the bin Laden family.

– See more at: http://whowhatwhy.com/2014/06/29/carlyle-groups-latest-acquisition-the-jfk-library/#sthash.WKR3EuQV.dpuf

Some things you truly cannot make up. Like this: the museum and archives celebrating and exploring the life (if not really wanting to investigate the death) of John F. Kennedy is getting a facelift—courtesy of….the Carlyle Group. – See more at: http://whowhatwhy.com/2014/06/29/carlyle-groups-latest-acquisition-the-jfk-library/#sthash.WKR3EuQV.dpuf

Some things you truly cannot make up. Like this: the museum and archives celebrating and exploring the life (if not really wanting to investigate the death) of John F. Kennedy is getting a facelift—courtesy of….the Carlyle Group.

This development was noted, without much fanfare, in a variety of major media. If there was a smidgen of irony, I missed it.

Yet, consider this: The ultimate globe-girdling corporation is playing a major role in preserving the memory of a president who at the time of his death was engaged in what may be described as mortal combat with outfits not unlike Carlyle—if smaller and less global. (I write about this in my book Family of Secrets but you can learn a lot more about JFK versus the corporations in Donald Gibson’s Battling Wall Street: The Kennedy Presidency.)

Kennedy was locked in grim battle with oil and steel and banking interests, hated by mining giants and soda pop companies, resisting pressures from the burgeoning defense industry, and on and on. The list of the offending and the aggrieved was endless. Executives were taking out ads to excoriate him, and even showing up at the White House to practically spit in his face.

“Those robbing bastards,” JFK told Walter Heller, chairman of the Council of Economic Advisors, when Heller mentioned the oil and gas industry. “I’m going to murder them.”—as cited in Family of Secrets, from audiotape held by John F. Kennedy Library and Museum

***

Why is the museum getting a facelift? Apparently, it is to “enhance the visual and interactive offerings.”

Does none of it have to do with the still-mysterious fire that broke out at the museum complex in Boston at approximately the same time as the bombings of the Boston Marathon? Initial news reports suggested that the fire might somehow be linked to the bombings, an event that led to the precedent-setting lockdown of a major American city in a military-style operation.

As with, well, practically everything about that day, we have since been assured that there was in fact no deeper mystery regarding the museum fire—that its cause was accidental and its timing a coincidence. And of course it may well have been, though I (a past user of the archives’ services) was struck by what seemed like a sheepish lack of openness on the part of library personnel when I made inquiries. Call it a reporter’s instincts.

JFK World vs Carlyle World

JFK, who entered the White House as outgoing president Eisenhower warned about the dangerous growth of a “military-industrial complex,” battled constantly with the same forces that today virtually reign supreme. He was an enthusiast of attempts in the mass media to draw attention to threats to freedom here at home, as seen in such movies as Seven Days in May, about a military coup against the U.S. government, and The Manchurian Candidate, about the subversion of our democratic system through mind control.

– See more at: http://whowhatwhy.com/2014/06/29/carlyle-groups-latest-acquisition-the-jfk-library/#sthash.y0R7QYCT.dpuf

Some things you truly cannot make up. Like this: the museum and archives celebrating and exploring the life (if not really wanting to investigate the death) of John F. Kennedy is getting a facelift—courtesy of….the Carlyle Group.

This development was noted, without much fanfare, in a variety of major media. If there was a smidgen of irony, I missed it.

Yet, consider this: The ultimate globe-girdling corporation is playing a major role in preserving the memory of a president who at the time of his death was engaged in what may be described as mortal combat with outfits not unlike Carlyle—if smaller and less global. (I write about this in my book Family of Secrets but you can learn a lot more about JFK versus the corporations in Donald Gibson’s Battling Wall Street: The Kennedy Presidency.)

Kennedy was locked in grim battle with oil and steel and banking interests, hated by mining giants and soda pop companies, resisting pressures from the burgeoning defense industry, and on and on. The list of the offending and the aggrieved was endless. Executives were taking out ads to excoriate him, and even showing up at the White House to practically spit in his face.

“Those robbing bastards,” JFK told Walter Heller, chairman of the Council of Economic Advisors, when Heller mentioned the oil and gas industry. “I’m going to murder them.”—as cited in Family of Secrets, from audiotape held by John F. Kennedy Library and Museum

***

Why is the museum getting a facelift? Apparently, it is to “enhance the visual and interactive offerings.”

Does none of it have to do with the still-mysterious fire that broke out at the museum complex in Boston at approximately the same time as the bombings of the Boston Marathon? Initial news reports suggested that the fire might somehow be linked to the bombings, an event that led to the precedent-setting lockdown of a major American city in a military-style operation.

As with, well, practically everything about that day, we have since been assured that there was in fact no deeper mystery regarding the museum fire—that its cause was accidental and its timing a coincidence. And of course it may well have been, though I (a past user of the archives’ services) was struck by what seemed like a sheepish lack of openness on the part of library personnel when I made inquiries. Call it a reporter’s instincts.

JFK World vs Carlyle World

JFK, who entered the White House as outgoing president Eisenhower warned about the dangerous growth of a “military-industrial complex,” battled constantly with the same forces that today virtually reign supreme. He was an enthusiast of attempts in the mass media to draw attention to threats to freedom here at home, as seen in such movies as Seven Days in May, about a military coup against the U.S. government, and The Manchurian Candidate, about the subversion of our democratic system through mind control.

– See more at: http://whowhatwhy.com/2014/06/29/carlyle-groups-latest-acquisition-the-jfk-library/#sthash.y0R7QYCT.dpuf

Some things you truly cannot make up. Like this: the museum and archives celebrating and exploring the life (if not really wanting to investigate the death) of John F. Kennedy is getting a facelift—courtesy of….the Carlyle Group.

This development was noted, without much fanfare, in a variety of major media. If there was a smidgen of irony, I missed it.

Yet, consider this: The ultimate globe-girdling corporation is playing a major role in preserving the memory of a president who at the time of his death was engaged in what may be described as mortal combat with outfits not unlike Carlyle—if smaller and less global. (I write about this in my book Family of Secrets but you can learn a lot more about JFK versus the corporations in Donald Gibson’s Battling Wall Street: The Kennedy Presidency.)

Kennedy was locked in grim battle with oil and steel and banking interests, hated by mining giants and soda pop companies, resisting pressures from the burgeoning defense industry, and on and on. The list of the offending and the aggrieved was endless. Executives were taking out ads to excoriate him, and even showing up at the White House to practically spit in his face.

“Those robbing bastards,” JFK told Walter Heller, chairman of the Council of Economic Advisors, when Heller mentioned the oil and gas industry. “I’m going to murder them.”—as cited in Family of Secrets, from audiotape held by John F. Kennedy Library and Museum

***

Why is the museum getting a facelift? Apparently, it is to “enhance the visual and interactive offerings.”

Does none of it have to do with the still-mysterious fire that broke out at the museum complex in Boston at approximately the same time as the bombings of the Boston Marathon? Initial news reports suggested that the fire might somehow be linked to the bombings, an event that led to the precedent-setting lockdown of a major American city in a military-style operation.

As with, well, practically everything about that day, we have since been assured that there was in fact no deeper mystery regarding the museum fire—that its cause was accidental and its timing a coincidence. And of course it may well have been, though I (a past user of the archives’ services) was struck by what seemed like a sheepish lack of openness on the part of library personnel when I made inquiries. Call it a reporter’s instincts.

JFK World vs Carlyle World

JFK, who entered the White House as outgoing president Eisenhower warned about the dangerous growth of a “military-industrial complex,” battled constantly with the same forces that today virtually reign supreme. He was an enthusiast of attempts in the mass media to draw attention to threats to freedom here at home, as seen in such movies as Seven Days in May, about a military coup against the U.S. government, and The Manchurian Candidate, about the subversion of our democratic system through mind control.

– See more at: http://whowhatwhy.com/2014/06/29/carlyle-groups-latest-acquisition-the-jfk-library/#sthash.y0R7QYCT.dpuf

Some things you truly cannot make up. Like this: the museum and archives celebrating and exploring the life (if not really wanting to investigate the death) of John F. Kennedy is getting a facelift—courtesy of….the Carlyle Group.

This development was noted, without much fanfare, in a variety of major media. If there was a smidgen of irony, I missed it.

Yet, consider this: The ultimate globe-girdling corporation is playing a major role in preserving the memory of a president who at the time of his death was engaged in what may be described as mortal combat with outfits not unlike Carlyle—if smaller and less global. (I write about this in my book Family of Secrets but you can learn a lot more about JFK versus the corporations in Donald Gibson’s Battling Wall Street: The Kennedy Presidency.)

Kennedy was locked in grim battle with oil and steel and banking interests, hated by mining giants and soda pop companies, resisting pressures from the burgeoning defense industry, and on and on. The list of the offending and the aggrieved was endless. Executives were taking out ads to excoriate him, and even showing up at the White House to practically spit in his face.

“Those robbing bastards,” JFK told Walter Heller, chairman of the Council of Economic Advisors, when Heller mentioned the oil and gas industry. “I’m going to murder them.”—as cited in Family of Secrets, from audiotape held by John F. Kennedy Library and Museum

***

Why is the museum getting a facelift? Apparently, it is to “enhance the visual and interactive offerings.”

Does none of it have to do with the still-mysterious fire that broke out at the museum complex in Boston at approximately the same time as the bombings of the Boston Marathon? Initial news reports suggested that the fire might somehow be linked to the bombings, an event that led to the precedent-setting lockdown of a major American city in a military-style operation.

As with, well, practically everything about that day, we have since been assured that there was in fact no deeper mystery regarding the museum fire—that its cause was accidental and its timing a coincidence. And of course it may well have been, though I (a past user of the archives’ services) was struck by what seemed like a sheepish lack of openness on the part of library personnel when I made inquiries. Call it a reporter’s instincts.

JFK World vs Carlyle World

JFK, who entered the White House as outgoing president Eisenhower warned about the dangerous growth of a “military-industrial complex,” battled constantly with the same forces that today virtually reign supreme. He was an enthusiast of attempts in the mass media to draw attention to threats to freedom here at home, as seen in such movies as Seven Days in May, about a military coup against the U.S. government, and The Manchurian Candidate, about the subversion of our democratic system through mind control.

– See more at: http://whowhatwhy.com/2014/06/29/carlyle-groups-latest-acquisition-the-jfk-library/#sthash.y0R7QYCT.dpuf

Some things you truly cannot make up. Like this: the museum and archives celebrating and exploring the life (if not really wanting to investigate the death) of John F. Kennedy is getting a facelift—courtesy of….the Carlyle Group.

This development was noted, without much fanfare, in a variety of major media. If there was a smidgen of irony, I missed it.

Yet, consider this: The ultimate globe-girdling corporation is playing a major role in preserving the memory of a president who at the time of his death was engaged in what may be described as mortal combat with outfits not unlike Carlyle—if smaller and less global. (I write about this in my book Family of Secrets but you can learn a lot more about JFK versus the corporations in Donald Gibson’s Battling Wall Street: The Kennedy Presidency.)

Kennedy was locked in grim battle with oil and steel and banking interests, hated by mining giants and soda pop companies, resisting pressures from the burgeoning defense industry, and on and on. The list of the offending and the aggrieved was endless. Executives were taking out ads to excoriate him, and even showing up at the White House to practically spit in his face.

“Those robbing bastards,” JFK told Walter Heller, chairman of the Council of Economic Advisors, when Heller mentioned the oil and gas industry. “I’m going to murder them.”—as cited in Family of Secrets, from audiotape held by John F. Kennedy Library and Museum

***

Why is the museum getting a facelift? Apparently, it is to “enhance the visual and interactive offerings.”

Does none of it have to do with the still-mysterious fire that broke out at the museum complex in Boston at approximately the same time as the bombings of the Boston Marathon? Initial news reports suggested that the fire might somehow be linked to the bombings, an event that led to the precedent-setting lockdown of a major American city in a military-style operation.

As with, well, practically everything about that day, we have since been assured that there was in fact no deeper mystery regarding the museum fire—that its cause was accidental and its timing a coincidence. And of course it may well have been, though I (a past user of the archives’ services) was struck by what seemed like a sheepish lack of openness on the part of library personnel when I made inquiries. Call it a reporter’s instincts.

JFK World vs Carlyle World

JFK, who entered the White House as outgoing president Eisenhower warned about the dangerous growth of a “military-industrial complex,” battled constantly with the same forces that today virtually reign supreme. He was an enthusiast of attempts in the mass media to draw attention to threats to freedom here at home, as seen in such movies as Seven Days in May, about a military coup against the U.S. government, and The Manchurian Candidate, about the subversion of our democratic system through mind control.

– See more at: http://whowhatwhy.com/2014/06/29/carlyle-groups-latest-acquisition-the-jfk-library/#sthash.y0R7QYCT.dpuf

Carlyle Group’s Latest Acquisition: the JFK Library ! | WhoWhatWhy.

Check out the original source here
ParaPolitics

www.parapolitics.info

Blood test concerns arise in ‘chemtrails’ meeting

Whatever you think about the subject of “chemtrails” this is some unique and interesting local media coverage and political response.

KINGMAN — One thing was clear after Wednesday night’s meeting in which people sought answers about so-called chemtrails. There’s a group of people throughout Mohave County who are concerned about high levels of heavy metal in their blood and they don’t know what caused it.

State Sen. Kelli Ward invited her constituents to meet with Arizona Department of Environmental Quality officials at the Mohave County administration building, so they could address their concerns about what they believe is poor air quality caused by vapor trails from passing jets. Some people believe there’s more than meets the eye when it comes to the condensation trails.

Read the rest of HavasuNews.com’s chemtrail coverage:

 

  1. Blood test concerns arise in ‘chemtrails’ meeting

    Thursday, June 26, 2014 12:01 am

    KINGMAN — One thing was clear after Wednesday night’s meeting in which people sought answers about so-called chemtrails. There’s a group of people throughout Mohave County who are concerned about high levels of heavy metal in their blood and they don’t know what caused it.

    1 image

  2. Chemtrails: Airing out an old conspiracy theory

    Tuesday, June 24, 2014 12:01 am

    There’s little doubt that “chemtrails” are anything more than an outlandish conspiracy theory. Those who believe otherwise say the condensation trails, left behind by jets at high altitudes, have something to do with efforts to fight global climate change, or perhaps are the result of top-secret government experimentation. This is the stuff of late-night talk radio.

  3. Ward calls public meeting to address chemtrails concerns

    Friday, June 20, 2014 12:01 am

    Mysterious white streaks in the skies over Mohave County are the subject of a meeting next week scheduled by state Sen. Kelli Ward.

    1 image

Search matches for chemtrail.

Blood test concerns arise in ‘chemtrails’ meeting – Havasu News: News.

Check out the original source here
ParaPolitics

www.parapolitics.info

National Security and Double Government by Michael J. Glennon

 

National Security and Double Government


https://i0.wp.com/www.elfis.net/blog/wp-content/plugins/wp-o-matic/cache/6d48002ea9_image-Glennon-Michael-J-2012.jpgMichael J. Glennon

Tufts University – The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy
January 10, 2014 / Harvard National Security Journal 1 (2014)

Abstract:

National security policy in the United States has remained largely constant from the Bush Administration to the Obama Administration. This continuity can be explained by the “double government” theory of the 19th-century scholar of the English Constitution, Walter Bagehot. As applied to the United States, Bagehot’s theory suggests that U.S. national security policy is defined by the network of executive officials who manage the departments and agencies responsible for protecting U.S. national security and who, responding to structural incentives embedded in the U.S. political system, operate largely removed from public view and from constitutional constraints. The public believes that the constitutionally-established institutions control national security policy, but that view is mistaken. Judicial review is negligible; congressional oversight is dysfunctional; and presidential control is nominal. Absent a more informed and engaged electorate, little possibility exists for restoring accountability in the formulation and execution of national security policy.

 

 

Number of Pages in PDF File: 114

 

Keywords: national security, double government,terrorism, Obama, Bush, military tribunal, Guantanamo, habeas, ABM, drone, CIA, NSA, torture, covert operations, cyberwar, state secrets, national security letters, surveillance, whistleblowers, espionage, metadata, Bagehot, civic virtue, Truman, Madison, Mills

Accepted Paper Series

National Security and Double Government by Michael J. Glennon :: SSRN.

 

 

http://fletcher.tufts.edu/Fletcher_Directory/Directory/Faculty%20Profile?personkey=7B7E5873-3A9E-4C26-BF94-6D307379EA2A

 

Michael J. Glennon

Professor of International Law

Biography

Michael J. Glennon is Professor of International Law at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University, in Medford, Massachusetts. Prior to going into teaching, he was Legal Counsel to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee (1977-1980) and Assistant Counsel in the Office of the Legislative Counsel of the United States Senate (1973-1977). In 1998 he was Distinguished Professor of International and Constitutional Law, Vytautus Magnus University School of Law, Kaunas, Lithuania. During the 2001-2002 academic year he was a Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, DC. In 2005 he was Thomas Hawkins Johnson Visiting Scholar at the United States Military Academy, West Point. In 2006 he was Director of Studies at the Hague Academy of International Law. He has been professor invité at the University of Paris II (Panthéon-Assas) since 2006. Professor Glennon has served as a consultant to various congressional committees, the U.S. State Department, and the International Atomic Energy Agency. He is a member of the American Law Institute and the Council on Foreign Relations. Professor Glennon is the author of numerous articles on constitutional and international law as well as several books. These include Limits of Law, Prerogatives of Power: Interventionism after Kosovo (Palgrave: 2001); United States Foreign Relations and National Security Law, 3rd ed. (with Thomas M. Franck and Sean Murphy; West Publishing Company: 2008); When No Majority Rules, (Congressional Quarterly Press (1992); Constitutional Diplomacy (Princeton University Press: 1990); and Foreign Affairs and the U.S. Constitution (co-edited with Louis Henkin and William D. Rogers; Transnational Publishers: 1990). He served on the Board of Editors of the American Journal of International Law from 1986 to 1999. Professor Glennon has testified before the International Court of Justice and congressional committees. A frequent commentator on public affairs, he has spoken widely within the United States and abroad and appeared on Nightline, the Today Show, NPR’s All Things Considered and other national news programs. His op-ed pieces have appeared in the New York Times, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, International Herald-Tribune, Financial Times, and Frankfurt Allgemeine Zeitung.
Curriculum Vitae – Michael J. Glennon

Professional Activities

  • Member, Council on Foreign Relations, American Law Institute
  • Professeur Invité, University of Paris II (Panthéon-Assas), 2006-2013
  • Professor of Law, University of California, Davis (1987-2002)
  • Thomas Hawkins Johnson Visiting Scholar at the United States Military Academy, West Point (2005)
  • Director of Studies at the Hague Academy of International Law (2006)
  • Fulbright Distinguished Professor of Law, Vytautus Magnus University School of Law, Kaunas, Lithuania (1998)
  • Fellow, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars (2001-2002)
  • private law practice, Washington, D.C. (1980-1981)
  • Legal Counsel, Senate Foreign Relations Committee (1977-1980)
  • Assistant Counsel, Office of the Legislative Counsel, U.S. Senate (1973-1977)
  • Consultant to U.S. Department of State (2004 – 2007), International Atomic Energy Agency (1998), Senate Foreign Relations Committee (1988) and Senate Judiciary Committee (1987)
  • Deak Prize recipient, American Society of International Law (1984)

Research Interests

  • Use of Force
  • Terrorism
  • Preemption
  • American Hegemony
  • Congress and Foreign Policy
  • Presidential Power
  • U.S. Foreign Relations Law
  • United Nations
  • International Law

ARTICLES
National Security and Double Government, 5 Harvard National Security Journal 1 (2014)
The Road Ahead: Gaps, Leaks and Drips
• Preempting Proliferation: International Law, Morality and Nuclear Weapons, 25 European Journal of International Law 110 (2013).
“The Blank-Prose Crime of Aggression,” 35 Yale Journal of International Law, Winter, 2010.
• Glennon, Michael J. “De l’absurdite du droit imperatif.” Revue Generale de Droit International Public 110, no. 3 (2006).
Glennon, Michael J. “NPT Withdrawal.” Fletcher Forum of World Affairs 30, no. 3 (2006): 43-52.
Glennon, Michael J. “Platonism, Adaptivism, and Illusion in UN Reform.” Chicago Journal of International Law 6, no. 2 (2006): 613-640.
Glennon, Michael J. “The Emerging Use-of-Force Paradigm.” The Journal of Conflict and Security Law 11, no. 3 (2006): 309-317.
• Glennon, Michael J. “How International Rules Die.” Georgetown Law Journal 93, (2005): 939-991.
Glennon, Michael J. “Idealism in the U.N. ” Policy Review 129, (2005): -.
Glennon, Michael J. “Sometimes a Great Notion.” The Wilson Quarterly 27, no. 4 (2003): 45-49.
Glennon, Michael J. “Teaching National Security Law.” Journal of Legal Education 55, no. 1 (2005): 49-56.
• Glennon, Michael J. “Does International Law Matter?” Journal of Social Affairs 21, no. 81 (2004): 89-.
Glennon, Michael J. “The Rise and Fall of the U.N.’s Charter Use of Force Rules.” Hastings International and Comparative Law Review 27, no. 3 (2004): 497-510.
• Glennon, Michael J. “Presidential Power to Wage War Against Iraq.” The Green Bag 6, (2003): 183-.
Glennon, Michael J. “Self-Determination and Cultural Diversity.” Fletcher Forum of World Affairs 27, no. 2 (2003): 75-84.
Glennon, Michael J. “The Case that Made the Court.” The Wilson Quarterly 27, no. 3 (2003): 20-28.
Glennon, Michael J. “The UN Security Council in a Unipolar World.” Virginia Journal of International Law 44, no. 1 (2003): 91-112.
• Glennon, Michael J. “United Nations: Time for a New Inquiry?” International Law Forum du Droit International 5, no. 4 (2003): 283-287.
Glennon, Michael J. “Why the Security Council Failed.” Foreign Affairs 82, no. 3 (2003): 16-35.
• Glennon, Michael J. “Preempting Terrorism: The Case for Anticipatory Self-Defense.” The Weekly Standard 7, no. 19 (2002): 24.
Glennon, Michael J. “Terrorism and the Limits of Law.” The Wilson Quarterly 26, no. 2 (2002).
• Glennon, Michael J. “The Fog of Law: Self-Defense, Inherence, and Incoherence in the United Nations Charter.” Harvard Journal of Law and Public Policy 25, no. 2 (2002): 539-559.
Glennon, Michael J. “American Hegemony in an Unplanned World Order.” The Journal of Conflict and Security Law 5, no. 1 (2000).
Glennon, Michael J. “The New Interventionism: The Search for a Just International Law.” Foreign Affairs 78, no. 3 (1999): 2-.
Glennon, Michael J. “A Madisonian Perspective on International Institutions: Overcommitment, Undercommitment, and Getting it Right.” University of Colorado Law Review 70, no. 4 (1999): 1589-1594.
Glennon, Michael J. “Congressional Access to Classified Information.” Berkeley Journal of International Law 16, no. 1 (1998): 126-137.
Glennon, Michael J. “Government Lawyering: Who’s the Client? Legislative Lawyering Through the Rear-View Mirror.” Law & Contemporary Problems 61, no. 2 (1998): 21-30.
• Glennon, Michael J. Process versus Policy in Foreign Relations: A Review of Foreign Affairs And The Constitution, by Louis Henkin (2nd ed., 1996), 95 Michigan Law Review 1101 (May, 1997).
Glennon, Michael J. “Sovereignty and Community After Haiti: Rethinking Collective Use of Force.” American Journal of International Law 89, no. 1 (1995): 70-74.
Glennon, Michael J. “Too Far Apart: Repeal the War Powers Resolution.” University of Miami Law Review 50, no. 1 (1995): 17-32.
Glennon, Michael J and A. Hayward. “Collective Security and the Constitution: Can the Commander-in-Chief Power Be Delegated to the United Nations?.” Georgetown Law Journal 82, no. 4 (1994): 1573-1604.
• Glennon, Michael J. State-Sponsored Abductions: A Comment on United States v. Alvarez-Machain, 86 American Journal of International Law 747 (1992).
• Glennon, Michael J. The Gulf War and the Constitution, 70 FOREIGN AFFAIRS 84 (Spring, 1991)[reprinted in T. LOWI, B. GINSBERG & A. HEARST, READINGS AND STUDY GUIDE FOR AMERICAN GOVERNMENT: FREEDOM AND POWER (2nd ed., 1992); C. FRENCH & H. BLUMBERG, THE GULF WAR: VIEWS FROM THE SOCIAL SCIENCES (1993); J. Roseti, READINGS IN THE POLITICS OF U.S. FOREIGN POLICY (1997)].
• Glennon, Michael J. Has International Law Failed the Elephant? 84 American Journal of International Law 1 (19¬90)
• Glennon, Michael J. The Constitution and Chapter VII of the UN Charter, 85 American Journal of International Law 74 (1991).
• Glennon, Michael J. Review of In The Name of War: Judicial Review and the War Powers Since 1918, by C. May, in 76 Journal of American History 1302 (1990).
• Glennon, Michael J. Publish and Perish: Congress’s Effort to Snip Snepp, Before and AFSA, 10 Michigan Journal of International Law 163 (1989).
• Glennon, Michael J. Interpreting “Interpretation”: The President, the Senate, and When Treaty Interpretation Becomes Treaty Making, 20 UC Davis Law Review 912 (July, 1987), reprinted in THE ABM TREATY AND THE CONSTITUTION: JOINT HEARINGS BEFORE THE SENATE COMMITTEE ON FOREIGN RELATIONS AND JUDICIARY, 99th Cong., 2d Sess. 821-828 (1987).
• Glennon, Michael J. Protecting the Court’s Institutional Interests: Why Not the Marbury Approach?, 81 American Journal of International Law 121 (January, 1987).
• Glennon, Michael J. Book Review, The Making of International Agreements: Congress Confronts the Executive, by Loch Johnson, 80 American Journal of International Law 1005 (October, 1986).
• Glennon, Michael J. Can the President Do No Wrong? 80 American Journal of International Law 923 (Oct., 1986).
• Glennon, Michael J. United States Mutual Security Treaties: The Commitment Myth, 24 Colombia Journal of Transnational Law 509 (April, 1986); excerpts also appear as The NATO Treaty: The Commitment Myth, in First Use of Nuclear Weapons: Under the Constitution, Who Decides?? (P. Raven-Hansen, ed.; Greenwood Press).
• Glennon, Michael J. Nicaragua v. United States of America: Con¬stitutionality of U.S. Modification of ICJ Jurisdic¬tion, 79 American Journal of International Law 571 (July, 1985).
• Glennon, Michael J. Raising The Paquete Habana: Is Violation of Customary International Law by the Executive Unconstitutional? 80 Northwestern Law Review 321 (Nov., 1985).
• Glennon, Michael J. The War Powers Resolution Ten Years Later: More Politics Than Law, 78 American Journal of International Law 571 (July, 1984).
• Glennon, Michael J. Liaison and the Law: Foreign Intelligence Agencies’ Activities in the United States, 25 HARVARD INTERNA¬TIONAL LAW JOURNAL 1 (Winter, 1984).
• Glennon, Michael J. Personal Autonomy in DEMOCRACY AND DISTRUST, 1 CONSTITUTIONAL COMMENTARY 229 (Summer, 1984).
• Glennon, Michael J. The Use of Custom in Resolving Separation of Powers Disputes, 64 Boston University Law Review 109 (1984).
Glennon, Michael J. The Senate Role in Treaty Ratification, 77 American Journal of International Law 257 (April, 1983).
• Glennon, Michael J. Treaty Process Reform: Saving Constitutionalism Without Destroying Diplomacy, University of Cinnicinati Law Review 84 (April, 1983).
• Glennon, Michael J. Strengthening the War Powers Resolution: The Case for Purse-strings Restric¬tions, 60 Minnesota Law Review 1 (November, 1975).
Glennon, Michael J. Law, Power, and Principles, 107 American Journal of International Law 378 (2013).
Glennon, Michael J. The Road Ahead: Gaps, Leaks and Drips.

BOOKS
The Fog of Law: Pragmatism, Security, and International Law by Michael J. Glennon
Glennon, Michael J. Limits of Law, Prerogatives of Power: Intervention After Kosovo. Palgrave, 2001.
Glennon, Michael J, Donald E. Lively, Phoebe A. Hadden, Dorothy E. Roberts and Russell L. Weaver. A Constitutional Law Anthology. Anderson Publishing Company, 1997.
Glennon, Michael J. Foreign Relations and National Security Law: Cases, Materials and Simulations. West Publishing Company, 1993.
Glennon, Michael J and Thomas M. Franck. United States Foreign Relations and National Security Law, 2nd Ed. West Publishing Company, 1993.
• Glennon, Michael J. When No Majority Rules: The Electoral College and Presidential Succession. Congressional Quarterly Press, 1992.
Glennon, Michael J. Constitutional Diplomacy. Princeton University Press, 1990.
Glennon, Michael J. Foreign Affairs and the U.S. Constitution.

BOOK CHAPTERS
Glennon, Michael J. “Un Combat Sui Generis.” In Justifier La Guerre?, eds. Gilles Andreani and Pierre Hassner, Sciences Po Les Presses, 2005.
Glennon, Michael J. “Droit, Legitimate, et Intervention Militaire.” In Justifier La Guerre?, eds. Gilles Andreani and Pierre Hassner, Sciences Po Les Presses, 2005.
Glennon, Michael J. “The United States: Democracy, Hegemony, and Accountability.” In Democratic Accountibility and the Use of Force in International Law, eds. C. Ku and H. Jacobson, Cambridge University Press, 2003.
Glennon, Michael J. “The Electoral College.” In ENCARTA, Microsoft Encyclopedia, 2003.
• Glennon, Michael J. “Louis Fisher and Diplomacy: Foreign Affairs and Coordinate Review.” In Politics and Constitutionalism: The Louis Fisher Connection, ed. R. Spitzer, SUNY Press, 2000.
• Glennon, Michael J. “Separation of Powers.” In Supplement II of the Encyclopedia of the American Constitution, eds. L. Levy, K. Karst, and A. Winkler, Macmillan, 1999.
• Glennon, Michael J. “The United States: Taking Environmental Treaties Seriously.” In Engaging Countries: Strengthening Compliance with International Environmental Accords, eds. H. Jacobson and E. Brown Weiss, MIT Press, 1998.
• Glennon, Michael J. The Senate and Foreign Policy, in THE ENCYCLOPEDIA OF THE AMERICAN CONSTITU¬TION (Macmi¬llan: 1993).
• Glennon, Michael J. “The War Powers Resolution.” In The Oxford Companion to the Politics of the World, Oxford University Press, 1993.
• Glennon, Michael J. The NATO Treaty; Little v. Barreme; The ANZUS Treaty; The Rio Treaty; Mutual Security Treaties; and The SEATO Treaty in An Encyclopedia of the American Presidency (1992).
• Glennon, Michael J. Two Views of Presidential Foreign Affairs Power: Little v. Barreme or United States v. Curtiss-Wright?, 13 Yale International Law Journal 5 (1988).
• Glennon, Michael J. Constitutional Issues in Terminating U.S. Acceptance, in The International Court of Justice at a Crossroads (L. Damrosch, ed.; Transnational Publishers, Inc., 1987).
• Glennon, Michael J. Investigating the Intelligence Community: The Process of Getting Information for Congress, in The Tethered Presidency 140 (T. Franck, ed.; NYU Press, 1981).
• Administrative Law, in I THE ENCYCLOPEDIA OF THE AMERICAN JUDICIAL SYSTEM 233, Macmillan Publishing Company (1987).

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS
• Glennon, Michael J. “The Cyber-Drone Attack on Law,” Keynote Address, The World Affairs Council of Rhode Island, Providence, RI, March 1, 2012.
• Glennon, Michael J. “International authorization and Domestic War Powers,” Columbia Law School, New York City, January 31, 2012.
• Glennon, Michael J. “The Nicaragua Case 25 Years Later: Its Impact on the Law and Court,” The Hague Academy of International Law, The Hague, Netherlands, June 27, 2011.
• Glennon, Michael J. “With Libya, the Security Council Is Not Congress,” Harvard Law School, Cambridge, MA, April 6, 2011.
• Glennon, Michael J. Keynote Address, “Law, Libya, and Credibility,” Fletcher/World Economic Forum Symposium on International Law, Medford, MA, April 29, 2011.
• Glennon, Michael J. “Pragmatism and International Law,” George Washington Law School, Washington, DC, March 9, 2011.
• Glennon, Michael J. “Terrorism and the Use of Force,” Duke Law School, Durham, NC, April 16, 2010.
• Glennon, Michael J. “The United States, the Rule of Law and the Use of Force: The Practice of States since the Adoption of the UN Charter,” Council on Foreign Relations, New York, December 16, 2009.
• Glennon, Michael J. “Torture, Terrorism, and Ticking Time Bombs,” address to the American University of Armenia, Yerevan, Armenia, Sept. 30, 2008.
• Glennon, Michael J. “The United States and the International Criminal Court,” Harvard Weatherhead Center conference, “World Order as a U.S.-European Issue,” Talloires, France, June 13, 2008.
• Glennon, Michael J. Testimony, “Negotiating a Long-Term Relationship with Iraq,”, Committee on Foreign Relations, United States Senate, Washington, DC, April 10, 2008.
• Testimony on Iraq before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, April 10, 2008,” (2008);
• Glennon, Michael J. Testimony, “War Powers in the 21st Century: The Constitutional Perspective,” Subcommittee on International Organizations, Human Rights and Oversight, Committee on Foreign Affairs, U.S. House of Representatives, Washington, DC, April 10, 2008.
• Glennon, Michael. Testimony, “U.S. Security Commitments to Iraq,” Subcommittee on International Organizations, Human Rights and Oversight, Committee on Foreign Affairs, U.S. House of Representatives, Washington, DC February 8, 2008.
• “Debate with Alain Pellet.” Hague Academy of International Law, September 7, 2007. (2007)
• Glennon, Michael J. “Force and the Settlement of Political Disputes” (debate with Alain Pellet), The Hague Colloquium on Topicality of the 1907 Hague Conference, September 7, 2007.
• Glennon, Michael J. “Constitutionality of Congressional Efforts to End the War in Iraq,” Panthéon-Assas (Paris II), Paris, March 20, 2007.
• Glennon, Michael J. “Peremptory Nonsense,” Panthéon-Assas (Paris II), Paris, March 24, 2006.
• Glennon, Michael J. “International Rules and American Pragmatism,” Sciences Po, Paris, March 23, 2006.
• Glennon, Michael J. “Legitimacy and the Use of Force: Discussion on the United Nations High-Level Panel on Threats, Challenges and Change,” Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, Washington, DC, March 23, 2005.
• Glennon, Michael J. “UN Reform and the Use of Force, Georgetown University, Washington, DC, February 24, 2005.
• Glennon, Michael J. “The Emerging Use-of-Force Paradigm,” Utrecht University, December 15, 2005.
• Glennon, Michael J. “International Legal Rules and Institutions: Why Do They Succeed or Fail?” Atlantic Council of the United States, Washington, DC, November 2, 2005.
• Glennon, Michael J. “A Non-Withdrawable NPT?” The Fletcher School, October 21, 2005.
• Glennon, Michael J. “Intervention, Preemption and the UN Charter,” Institute of Peace and Conflict Studies, New Delhi, India, June 22, 2004.
• Glennon, Michael J. “Forging a Common Understanding: The United States and UN Reform,” conference sponsored by the U.S. Department of State and the Central Intelligence Agency, National Intelligence Council, Washington, DC, May 6, 2004.
• Glennon, Michael J. “Preemption of Threats to Security,” International Conference sponsored by the Aspen Institute, United Nations Foundation and Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, The United Nations and New Threats: Rethinking Security, Rome, May 28, 2004.
• Glennon, Michael J. “The U.S. and Europe: Two Models for a New Political World Order,” debates with Prof. Herfried Münkler (Humboldt University, Berlin) at the Goethe Institut, New York (May 11, 2004) and Boston (May 13, 2004).
• Glennon, Michael J. “Does International Law Matter?”, plenary session, American Society of International Law, Washington, DC, April 2, 2004.
• Glennon, Michael J. “Glennon and His Critics,” panel discussion, International Studies Association, Montreal, March 19, 2004.
• Glennon, Michael J. “The Coalition of the Willing: A (Mostly) Unilateral Exercise of Preventative Self-Defense,” New York University Law School, February 27, 2004.
• Glennon, Michael J. “The Rise and Fall of the UN’s Use of Force Rules,” the Rudolf B. Schlesinger Lecture on International and Comparative Law, University of California, Hastings, College of Law, February 12, 2004
• Glennon, Michael J. “United Nations Reform: Challenges Ahead,” Council on Foreign Relations, New York, December 14, 2004.
• Glennon, Michael J. “The Future of the United Nations,” National Defense University, Washington, DC, November 22, 2004.
• Glennon, Michael J. “Triggers of War,” World Economic Forum, Davos, Switzerland, January 22, 2004.
• Glennon, Michael J. “Authority and Legitimacy in Use of Force,” Symposium on Moral Dilemmas of Military Intervention, Centre d’Etudes et de Recherches Internationales, Paris, January 16, 2004.
• Glennon, Michael J. “Law, Intelligence and Security,” CIA Intelligence Fellows Program, Wye River, Maryland, August 7, 2003.
• Glennon, Michael J. “Global Risks and Realities: The Role of the UN,” John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, May 3, 2003.
• Glennon, Michael J. “The UN Security Council in a Unipolar World,” Fletcher Alumni Association, Medford, May 15, 2003; and Talloires, France, June 7, 2003.
• Glennon, Michael J. “Preemption: The Policy Implications,” Council on Foreign Relations, Harvard University, May 15, 2003.
• Glennon, Michael J. “Self-defense in a Age of Terrorism,” American Society of International Law, Washington, DC, April 4, 2003.
• Glennon, Michael J. “Why the Security Council Failed,” Foreign Policy Roundtable, New York City, April 30, 2003.
• Glennon, Michael J. “The Collapse of the UN Charter’s Use-of-Force Rules,” International Law Society, Harvard Law School, Cambridge, Massachusetts, December 4, 2003.
• Glennon, Michael J. “American Primacy,” Chicago Council on Foreign Relations, Chicago, November 18, 2003.
• Glennon, Michael J. “Using Military Force: Duties and Restraints,” Carnegie Council on Ethics and International Affairs, New York City, November 14, 2003.
• Glennon, Michael J. “The American Approach To Unilateralism and Multilateralism in International Law,” Institute for Legal Policy, University of Trier, Germany, October 9, 2003.
• Glennon, Michael J. “Can the United Nations Survive?” World Policy Institute, New School, New York City, October 2, 2003.
• Glennon, Michael J. “Who Can Order War?” American Enterprise Institute, Washington, DC, January 23, 2003.
• Glennon, Michael J. “Reflections on J. William Fulbright,” keynote address to incoming Fulbright scholars, Roosevelt Hotel, New York City, March 7, 2002.
• Glennon, Michael J. “The Use of Force,” Marshall-Wythe School of Law, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA, February 5, 2002.
• Glennon, Michael J. “The Detention of Guantanamo Prisoners and the Geneva Conventions,” George Washington University Law School, Washington, DC, February 13, 2002.
• Glennon, Michael J. Interview, “The Supreme Court and Presidential Powers,” C-SPAN Washington Journal, February 10, 2002.
• Glennon, Michael J. “The Role of the United Nations in Maintaining International Peace and Security in the 21st Century,” American Branch, International Law Association, New York City, October 25, 2002.
• Glennon, Michael J. “Balance and Limits in Post-September 11th America,” address to incoming Ron Brown Scholars, Wyndham City Hotel, Washington, DC, January 25, 2002.
• Glennon, Michael J. “The United Nations Charter and the War Against Terrorism,” Georgetown University Law School, Washington, DC, November 26, 2001.
• Glennon, Michael J. “Terrorism and International Law,” Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC, November 15, 2001.
• Glennon, Michael J. “The New Interventionism,” United Nations Association, Sacramento Chapter, Sacram¬ento, February 28, 2000.
• Glennon, Michael J. Interview, Nightline, ABC Television (electoral college and Supreme Court litigation), December 8, 2000.
Glennon, Michael J. Interview, The Washington Post: Live On-Line (the Electoral College), December 14, 2000 (http://discuss.washingtonpost.com/zforum/00/freemedia121400_glennon.htm).
• Glennon, Michael J. Interview, All Things Considered, National Public Radio (deadline for selection of presidential electors), December 11, 2000.
• Glennon, Michael J. Interview, The Today Show, NBC Television (conflicting slates of presidential electors), December 1, 2000.
• Glennon, Michael J. “No. 1 refusenik talks to UCD prof on human rights” [interview with Anatole Sharan¬sky], 3 Dateline/UCD 1, Jan. 12, 1990.

OP-EDS
• Glennon, Michael J. “The Vague Crime of Aggression,” International Herald Tribune, April 6, 2010.
• Glennon, Michael J. “In Memoriam: Thomas M. Franck (1931-2009), 84 New York University Law Review 1385 (Dec., 2009).
• Glennon, Michael J. ‘Trying Terror: Two books on how our legal system is adjusting to terrorism,” Washington Post, Sept. 14, 2008.
• Glennon, Michael J. “Hill Approval Required Before Attacking Iran,” Roll Call, Dec. 4, 2007.
Glennon, Michael J. “Go Long? Go Big? Go Back to Congress.” The Washington Post, 7 December 2006.
• Glennon, Michael J. “La réforme des Nations Unies: mythe ou projet?”, interview, Questions internationals, (Janvier-Févier 2005).
• Glennon, Michael J. “Welche Rolle spielt das Volkerrecht wirklich?”, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, Sept. 27, 2004.
• Glennon, Michael J. “How U.S. Lawyers Read the Constitution: Sanctioning Torture,” International Herald Tribune, June 18, 2004.
• Glennon, Michael. “A Stronger Security Council Is No Solution,” Financial Times, December 13, 2004.
• Glennon, Michael J. “Louis Henkin,” Yale Biographical Dictionary of American Law, Yale University Press (2004).
• Glennon, Michael J. “Der Traum,” Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, June 26, 2003.
• Glennon, Michael J. “The UN Security Council, Europe, and American Hegemony,” Aspenia (published by Aspen Institute Italia), June, 2003.
Glennon, Michael J. “A Fractured Planet Needs Pragmatism,” International Herald Tribune, April 23, 2003.
• Glennon, Michael J. “Krieg im Irak: Bricht Amerika das Völkerrecht?” Focus, March 24, 2003.
• Glennon, Michael J. “How War Left the Law Behind.” The New York Times, 21 November 2002, 37.
• Glennon, Michael J. “Forging a Third Way to Fight: ‘Bush Doctrine’ for combating terrorism straddles divide between crime and war,” Legal Times, Sept. 24, 2001, at page 68.
• Glennon, Michael J. “There’s a Point to Going it Alone: Unilateralism Has Often Served Us Well.” The Washington Post, 12 August 2001, B02.
• Glennon, Michael J. “The Catch: Justice Demands Different Treatment for Those Who Wage War Against Us.” The Washington Post, 23 December 2001, B01.
• Glennon, Michael J. “Yes, There Is an ABM Treaty,” Washington Post, Sept. 4, 2000, at page A25.
• Glennon, Michael J. “It’s Not Over Till It’s Over, and Maybe Not Then,” Washington Post (Sunday Outlook Section), Nov. 19, 2000, at page B02.
• Glennon, Michael J. “The Charter: Does It Fit?”, 36 The United Nations Chronicle 32 (No. 2, July, 1999).
• Glennon, Michael J. “The Perfect World Heritage Site: Lake Tahoe,” The Tahoe Daily Tribune, July 14, 1997.
• Glennon, Michael J. “War by Default?”, New York Newsday, Sunday, Sept. 9, 1990 (p. 1 of “Ideas” Section).
• Glennon, Michael J. “Bush Was Wrong to Ignore Congress,” guest interview, USA Today, Sept. 12, 1990.
• Glennon, Michael J. “Congress’ Shrinking Role in Waging War: Lessons from Another Gulf,” The Sacramento Bee, Aug. 22, 1990.
• Glennon, Michael J. “The Archaic Practice of ‘Recognition,’” The Christian Science Monitor, April 23, 1990.
• Glennon, Michael J. “The UN Security Council Can’t Substitute for Congress,” The Christian Science Monitor, Dec. 20, 1990.
• Glennon, Michael J. “A Legitimate Gulf Policy—Spell It Out,” The Sacramento Bee (Sunday Forum Section), Nov. 25, 1990.
• Glennon, Michael J. “In Memoriam: Leonard B. Boudin (1912-1989),” 23 U.C. Davis Law Review 773 (1990).
• Glennon, Michael J. “The Good Friday Accords: Legislative Veto by Another Name?” 83 American Journal of International Law 554 (editorial)(July, 1989).
• Glennon, Michael J. “Dukakis’ Pledge of Allegiance to the Constitution,” The Sacramento Bee, September 1, 1988.
• Glennon, Michael J. “In Foreign Policy, The Court Is Clear: President Is Subject to Will of Con¬gress,” Los Angeles Times (Sunday Forum Section), July 19, 1987 (reprinted in San Francisco Chronicle, July 29, 1987).
• Glennon, Michael J. “The Boland Amendment and the Power of the Purse,” Christian Science Monitor, June 15, 1987.
• Glennon, Michael J. “The Administration’s Reinterpretation of the ABM Treaty,” The Sacramento Bee, April 7, 1987.
• Glennon, Michael J. “Combining House, Senate Intelligence Committees a Simple-Minded Idea,” Atlanta Constitution, October 21, 1987 (with L. Johnson).
• Glennon, Michael J. “Disinvestment: Is It Constitutional?” The Sacramento Bee, September 25, 1986.
• Glennon, Michael J. “Mr. Sofaer’s War Powers ‘Partnership,’” 80 American Journal of International Law 584 (editorial)(July, 1986).
• Glennon, Michael J. “Terrorism and ‘Intentional Ignorance’,” Christian Science Monitor, March 20, 1986.
• Glennon, Michael J. Interview, The Today Show, by Bryant Gumbel (with Enrique Bermudez, contra military command¬er), March, 1985.
• Glennon, Michael J. “In Cuba, A Belief US Must Face Reality” (with Prof. Burns Weston), The Boston Globe, June 8, 1984 and The Cincinnati Enquirer, June 9, 1984.
• Glennon, Michael J. “War Powers Act and Common Sense,” Los Angeles Times, September 15, 1983.
• Glennon, Michael J. “Playboy and the Constitution,” The Cincinnati En¬quirer, June 10, 1983.
• Glennon, Michael J. “Some Compromise,” Christian Science Monitor, October 24, 1983.
• Glennon, Michael J. “AWACS, Reagan and the Law,” The Cincinnati Enquirer, October 21, 1981.

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Mexico to legalize vigilantes fighting drug cartel

Mexico to legalize vigilantes fighting drug cartel

By ALBERTO ARCE 

Mexico’s government plans on Saturday to begin demobilizing a vigilante movement of assault rifle-wielding ranchers and farmers that formed in the western state of Michoacan and succeeded in largely expelling the Knights Templar cartel when state and local authorities couldn’t.

Mexico to legalize vigilantes fighting drug cartel - Yahoo News

An armed female member of the Self-Defense Council of Michoacan (CAM) patrols a checkpoint set up by the self-defense group in Chuquiapan on the outskirts of the seaport of Lazaro Cardenas in western Mexico, Friday, May 9, 2014. Mexico’s government plans to begin demobilizing the vigilante movement that largely expelled the Knights Templar cartel when state and local authorities couldn’t. A ceremony on Saturday will mark the registering of thousands of guns by the federal government and an agreement that the self-defense groups will either join a new official rural police force or return to their normal lives and act as voluntary reserves when called on. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)

The ceremony in the town of Tepalcatepec, where the movement began in February 2013, will involve the registration of thousands of guns by the federal government and an agreement that the so-called “self-defense” groups will either join a new official rural police force or return to their normal lives and acts as voluntary reserves when called on.

The government will go town by town to organize and recruit the new rural forces.

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Mexico to legalize vigilantes fighting drug cartel – Yahoo News.

 

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This Giant Portrait Of A Child Shows Drone Operators The Human Face Of Their Victims

This Giant Portrait Of A Child Shows Drone Operators The Human Face Of Their Victims

This Giant Portrait Of A Child Shows Drone Operators The Human Face Of Their Victims.

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American Intel Complex Vs Congress

In 2007, reporter Charles Davis asked then-Chairman of the Senate Intelligence committee – Jay Rockefeller – about clandestine U.S. operations against a foreign government.

Here’s the exchange (listen to the minute plus recording or just listen to the 20-second money quote):

DAVIS: Reports quote administration officials as saying this is going on and it’s being done in a way to avoid oversight of the Intelligence Committee. Is there any way—

ROCKEFELLER: They’ll go to any lengths to do that, as we’ve seen in the last two days [during hearings on FISA].

DAVIS: Is there anything you could do in your position as Chairman of the Intelligence Committee to find answers about this, if it is in fact going on?

ROCKEFELLER: Don’t you understand the way Intelligence works? Do you think that because I’m Chairman of the Intelligence Committee that I just say I want it, and they give it to me? They control it. All of it. ALL of it. ALL THE TIME. I only get –  and my committee only gets –  what they WANT to give me.

This is shocking … but not new.

The NSA was created in secret … and Congress wasn’t even notified.

During the Vietnam war, the NSA spied on two prominent politicians: Senators Frank Church and Howard Baker.  Church was the chairman of the committee investigating wrongdoing by the NSA and other intelligence agencies.

Reuters notes:

This power struggle burst into public view during the Church Committee hearings of the  mid-1970s. The Senate hearings stunned the nation with revelations about CIA assassination plots and illegal activities. The result was the creation of congressional committees designed to give the lawmakers greater control over intelligence.

In the aftermath of the horrific September 11 attacks, however, President George W. Bush, aided and abetted by his powerful vice president, Dick Cheney, essentially gave the CIA [and all other intelligence agencies] a free pass to fight the  ”war on terrorism.”

***

The battle erupted on the Senate floor on Tuesday when Senator Diane Feinstein (D-Calif.), the intelligence panel’s chairwoman and normally a staunch CIA defender, denounced it for allegedly spying on committee investigators and violating the constitutional separation of powers.

***

The Senate investigators in that basement had discovered an internal CIA study that appeared to agree with many of the Senate report’s critical findings. Senator Mark Udall (D-Colo.) said the internal study “conflicts” with [CIA head] Brennan’s rebuttal. CIA officials suspected that the Senate investigators had obtained unauthorized access to the internal study, and yanked the documents from the  basement computers. Feinstein said Tuesday that the CIA had not only searched the committee’s computers but had referred the matter  to the Justice Department as a criminal case.

The White House has also withheld 9,400 documents from the Senate’s CIA torture investigation.

The Washington Times reported in 2006 that – when high-level NSA whistleblower Russell Tice offered to testify to Congress about this illegal spying – he was informed by the NSA that the Senate and House intelligence committees were not cleared to hear such information:

Renee Seymour, director of NSA special access programs stated in a Jan. 9 letter to Russ Tice that he should not testify about secret electronic intelligence programs because members and staff of the House and Senate intelligence committees do not have the proper security clearances for the secret intelligence.

(And see this.)

Former high-level NSA executive Bill Binney points out how absurd that statement is:

Russ Tice … was prepared to testify to Congress to this, too, and so NSA sent him a letter saying, we agree that you have a right to go to Congress to testify, but we have to advise you that the intelligence committees that you want to testify to are not cleared for the programs you want to speak about. Now, that fundamentally is an open admission … by NSA that they are violating the intelligence acts of 1947 and 1978, which require NSA and all other intelligence agencies to notify Congress of all the programs that they’re running so they can have effective oversight, which they’ve never had anyway.

It was widely reported in 2009 the CIA had hidden a major program from Congress.

To this day, Congress members get more information about NSA spying from reading the newspaper than they get in classified NSA briefings.

Congressman Justin Amash said that the NSA would only divulge information in classified briefings if Congress guessed at the right questions:

Amash said that intelligence officials are often evasive during classified briefings and reveal little new information unless directly pressed.

“You don’t have any idea what kind of things are going on,” Amash said. “So you have to start just spitting off random questions. Does the government have a moon base? Does the government have a talking bear? Does the government have a cyborg army? If you don’t know what kind of things the government might have, you just have to guess and it becomes a totally ridiculous game of twenty questions.

A senior staffer for the Chair of the Senate Intelligence Committee – one of the biggest apologists for NSA spying- confirms Amash’s statement:

Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.), chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, said in August that the committee has less information about, and conducts less oversight of, intelligence-gathering that relies solely on presidential authority. She said she planned to ask for more briefings on those programs.

“In general, the committee is far less aware of operations conducted under 12333,” said a senior committee staff member, referring to Executive Order 12333, which defines the basic powers and responsibilities of the intelligence agencies. “I believe the NSA would answer questions if we asked them, and if we knew to ask them, but it would not routinely report these things, and in general they would not fall within the focus of the committee.”

In other words, the intelligence agencies are rogue.

Congress Not Informed that the Constitution Was More Or Less Suspended

But perhaps the most dramatic example of the Executive branch wholly stonewalling Congress occurred when Dick Cheney implemented “Continuity of Government” plans on 9/11.  This created a “shadow government” which largely sidelined Congress and suspended the Constitution.  But Congress wasn’t even informed.

As CBS pointed out, virtually none of the Congressional leadership knew that Continuity of Government (“COG” for short) had been implemented or was still in existence as of March 2002:

Key congressional leaders say they didn’t know President Bush had established a “shadow government,” moving dozens of senior civilian managers to secret underground locations outside Washington to ensure that the federal government could survive a devastating terrorist attack on the nation’s capital, The Washington Post says in its Saturday editions.

Senate Majority Leader Thomas A. Daschle (D-S.D.) told the Post he had not been informed by the White House about the role, location or even the existence of the shadow government that the administration began to deploy the morning of the Sept. 11 hijackings.

An aide to House Minority Leader Richard A. Gephardt (D-Mo.) said he was also unaware of the administration’s move.

Among Congress’s GOP leadership, aides to House Speaker J. Dennis Hastert (Ill.), second in line to succeed the president if he became incapacitated, and to Senate Minority Leader Trent Lott (Miss.) said they were not sure whether they knew.

Aides to Sen. Robert C. Byrd (D-W. Va.) said he had not been told. As Senate president pro tempore, he is in line to become president after the House speaker.

CNN reported:

Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle, D-South Dakota, said Friday he can’t say much about the plan.

“We have not been informed at all about the role of the shadow government or its whereabouts or what particular responsibilities they have and when they would kick in, but we look forward to work with the administration to get additional information on that.”

Indeed, the White House has specifically refused to share information about Continuity of Government plans with the Homeland Security Committee of the U.S. Congress, even though that Committee has proper security clearance to hear the full details of all COG plans.

Specifically, in the summer 2007, Congressman Peter DeFazio, on the Homeland Security Committee (and so with proper security access to be briefed on COG issues), inquired about continuity of government plans, and was refused access. Indeed, DeFazio told Congress that the entire Homeland Security Committee of the U.S. Congress has been denied access to the plans by the White House.

(Or here is the transcript).

The Homeland Security Committee has full clearance to view all information about COG plans.

DeFazio concluded: “Maybe the people who think there’s a conspiracy out there are right”.

University of California Berkeley Professor Emeritus Peter Dale Scott points out that – whether or not COG plans are still in effect – the refusal of the executive branch to disclose their details to Congress means that the Constitutional system of checks and balances has already been gravely injured:

If members of the Homeland Security Committee cannot enforce their right to read secret plans of the Executive Branch, then the systems of checks and balances established by the U.S. Constitution would seem to be failing.

To put it another way, if the White House is successful in frustrating DeFazio, then Continuity of Government planning has arguably already superseded the Constitution as a higher authority.

Postscript: Whistleblowers allege that the intelligence agencies are blackmailing Congress.

In any event, the courts don’t have any oversight over the intelligence agencies either:

  • When these judges raised concerns about NSA spying, the Justice Department completely ignored them

 

“Do You Think That Because I’m CHAIRMAN of The Intelligence Committee That I Just Say “I Want It”, and They Give It To Me? … | Zero Hedge.

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